Copy Is My New Dropbox Replacement

copy

I’ve written about other Dropbox alternatives before. I still use Dropbox daily, but am always interested in the alternatives, especially free alternatives that provide more free storage space.

Copy is one of those alternatives, and I think it may eventually replace Dropbox entirely for me.

They start off by giving you 15GB of free storage. If you sign up from someone’s referral link, like mine (https://next-d.copy.com?r=1XNUBL), you’ll get an additional 5GB. So you’ll start of with 20GB of storage, free. Get friends to sign up using your link and you’ll get 5GB for each referral.

But, if you don’t sign up from someone’s referral link, you’ll only have 15GB to start, instead of 20GB. You’ve also got to install the client somewhere (on your pc or phone) before you get the additional 5GB after signing up.

Their pricing is incredibly, absolutely sane, too. $9.99 a month will get you 250GB of storage, or $99 every year for the same 250GB.

I really like Copy because of it’s linux client and because of it’s Android client. Both are very nice and easy to use. I especially like the Android client because it will auto-upload photos and videos you take, just like Dropbox for Android does.

The Copy iOS client doesn’t do auto-uploads like the Android client does. I guess that’s what they get for using iOS devices. I have included a screenshot of Copy on an iPad mini on iOS 6.1.3. You can see it in the gallery at the end of the post.

The linux client is nice but I’d like to see it cleaned up a little. It consumes nearly as much memory on my Xubuntu 13.04 box as Dropbox does. CopyAgent uses 57.7 MB of RAM and dropbox uses 60.2 MB.

So, if you like this kinda stuff, sign up for Copy using my referral link.

How-To: Full Featured Time-Lapse on Android

Droid Lapse

I’ve used Lapse It for a long time. I didn’t use it often enough to buy the Pro version though. I discovered an app named Droid Timelapse the other day, and I love it. Droid Timelapse is developed by Neximo Labs.

Droid Timelapse has a really nice user interface. It’s also got a lot of features that you don’t get in the free version of Lapse It.

If you want to take a time-lapse photo now and then, I’d definitely suggest Droid Timelapse. Lots of features, it’s free, has no ads, and has awesome reviews on the Play Store.

There’s a pro version of Droid Timelapse as well. It allows recording with the screen off and allows you to set custom capture rate intervals, up to 24 hours. It’s tempting to buy the pro version just to support development, but I really don’t use the app often. Maybe a few times a year when there’s some cool clouds rolling overhead.

I’ve included a gallery of screenshots below, but you’ll have to be viewing the full article to see them, they won’t show up on the front page.
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CyanogenDefy Mirror for Motorola Defy ROM’s Is Dead

ICS Home Screen

If you’re reading this post, chances are you’ve landed here looking for my CyanogenDefy Mirror. I’ve stopped maintaining that mirror as I no longer use my Motorola Defy, that phone has been given to my daughter. I recently got a Nexus 4, so I’ve been running a Nexus 4 Mirror instead.

I recently switched from Dreamhost to FlipHost, and in the transition I didn’t bother moving all the files that were on the CyanogenDefy Mirror. There was something like 20GB worth of ROM’s there, something I didn’t want to move if not absolutely necessary.

So, if you’re here looking for builds from Quarx2k or other stuff for your Motorola Defy, I’m sorry to disappoint you.

New Flickr Still Sucks on Android

Flickr

I wrote a post a couple months ago asking Flickr why they can’t add automatic photo upload to their Android app. Today, Yahoo made a lot of updates to Flickr, along with their purchase of Tumblr, but that’s a whole other story.

The new Flickr Android app interface is definitely better than it was. But it’s still missing the one key feature that it needs, and that’s automatic photo uploading. Dropbox does it, Google+ does it, there’s even third party apps to do this with Flickr, even though none seem to work any longer.

I managed to kind of sync my phone photos to Flickr. It involves using Ifttt, copying my photos to a specific public Dropbox folder, and telling Ifttt to send all photos in that folder to Flickr. Not the best solution but it’s all I’ve got for now.

Yahoo, please, please add automatic photo uploading in the next version of your Android app. I’m literally begging you. Flickr is supposed to be the place that ALL my photos end up, but that can’t be until you implement automatic photo uploading.

I’ve been a Pro member for at least 7 years. The least you can do is hook me up with a much needed feature. :)

How-To: Install/Update Custom Recovery on Nexus 4 (Mako)

TWRP2

I use TWRP (Team-Win Recovery Project) as a custom recovery. It’s easy to use and, as the name suggests, has a nice touch interface. TWRP supports a bunch of devices, including the Nexus 4 (Mako).

Here’s the full description straight from the TWRP site:

Team Win Recovery Project 2.4, or twrp2 for short, is a custom recovery built with ease of use and customization in mind. We started from the ground up by taking AOSP recovery and loading it with the standard recovery options, then added a lot of our own features. It’s a fully touch driven user interface – no more volume rocker or power buttons to mash. The GUI is also fully XML driven and completely theme-able. You can change just about every aspect of the look and feel.

 

Installing TWRP on your Google Nexus 4 is pretty simple. The TWRP site has good instructions, but I always forget how to update when a new version is released. And checking the actual TWRP site was something I didn’t think of doing, because I thought I had installed TWRP through a separate tool (which I did).

So, the suggested method for installing TWRP to your Google Nexus 4 (and the method I use) is really straight forward. You’ll need root.

  1. Install GooManager from the Play Store and open it up (grant it root permissions).
  2. Select the menu and then tap “Install OpenRecoveryScript”, then tap “Yes”.
  3. Make sure the filename says “mako” in it somewhere, this ensures you’ll get the Nexus 4 recovery.
  4. Tap “Yes” again.
  5. That’s it, TWRP will be downloaded and installed automatically.

Below are some TWRP2 screenshots, taken straight from the TWRP website. If you’re interested in contributing to TWRP, you can check out their project on Github.