Fort.js: A Modern Progress Bar for Form Completion

fortjs

Modern progress bars for your forms

Fort.js is cool. It makes adding progress bars to your forms extremely easy. It’s especially useful for signup forms, or any form where it’s nice to see how far along in the process you are.

I don’t have Fort.js in use on any public facing sites yet, but the Kegplan.io dev site has an updated signup process that makes use of Fort.js, and I love it.

Fort.js comes with four different effects: default, gradient, sections, and flash. I typically use the Sections effect, it makes it very easy to see how far along you are in the form.

I’d love Fort.js even more if changing the colors was a bit easier. Changing the progress bar colors varies depending on which effect you’re using, but it’s all documented in the README.

Fort.js and related documentation can be found on GitHub.

Receive Alerts On SSH or SFTP Logins with Papertrail

papertrail

Frustration-free log management, plus a lot more

I’ve been a huge fan of Papertrail ever since I discovered it, probably about a year ago or so. I use it mostly to monitor server logs. I currently have two servers setup to send syslog messages to Papertrail.

The Papertrail Events dashboard can be a bit overwhelming at first, but the provided search is powerful and allows you to finely control which log messages you see and which you don’t.

You can even setup saved searches to fire when a specific event occurs. For example, I have a saved search that searches for the following:
Accepted publickey for tyler

When that message shows up in Papertrail, it means that I logged in, or that someone else has logged in using my SSH key. This can be quite handy, especially if you’re a one man shop like me and are usually the only person that has SSH or SFTP access to a server.

Getting a DigitalOcean VPS added to Papertrail, especially if it’s running Debian or Ubuntu, is super easy. It just requires that you modify /etc/rsyslog.conf and add a line to the end of the file that will send a copy of the system logs to Papertrail.

Papertrail can monitor application logs, too, such as Apache httpd logs and MySQL server logs, although that takes a bit more configuration to get working properly.

If nothing else, it’s just nice having system logs aggregated in one central place, where everything is easy to search through, making it easy to find exactly what you’re looking for. If you’re an admin for one server or hundreds of servers, Papertrail could turn out to be one of your favorite tools. It’s definitely one of my favorites.

I suggest you give Papertrail a try, can’t hurt, they even have a plan that’s free forever. It’s definitely a great service for monitoring server logs.

Pretty YouTube Embeds with PrettyEmbed.js

PrettyEmbed.js

Prettier embeds for your YouTubes

PrettyEmbed.js is a jQuery plugin for making YouTube embeds look much better. It’s on GitHub, and a demo can be seen here on CodePen.

PrettyEmbed.js works with FitVid.js, but it’s not required, and comes with options like high-res preview images and advanced customization of embed options.

You can see some of the advanced customization options in the CodePen demo below. Just click the “JS” tab to see the JavaScript.

See the Pen PrettyEmbed.js Demo by Mike Zarandona (@mike-zarandona) on CodePen.

How-To: Reset WordPress Database to Default Settings

wpdb-reset

Easily Reset Your WordPress Database

WordPress Database Reset is a WordPress plugin I recently came across that will at some point prove very, very useful to me.

It’s not often that I need to reset a production WordPress database to it’s default settings, but this plugin will make the task a whole lot easier. Chris Berthe, the author, describes the plugin like this:

WordPress Database Reset is a secure and easy way to reinitialize your WordPress database back to its default settings without actually having to reinstall WordPress yourself.

I can see this being crazy useful for WordPress plugin and theme developers. We frequently need a fresh database to work with, so I’ll be adopting this plugin in my WordPress plugin and theme development workflow from here on.

WordPress Database Reset requires WordPress 3.0+ and can be installed just like any other WordPress plugin. It’s in the WordPress Plugin directory, and can also be found on GitHub.

If you’re a WordPress theme or plugin developer, you should definitely check it out.

More Responsive Tables

RWD-Table-Patternspng

Responsive Tables for Twitter Bootstrap, but not necessarily. From @nadangergeo & @filamentgroup!

I made a post the other day about the responsive table plugins provided by TableSaw. They’re nice, but if you’re using Twitter Bootstrap (like I and many, many others do), RWD-Table Patterns may suit you better. There’s a demo here.

It’s mobile first, and is made with Twitter Bootstrap, although you can remove Bootstrap in your own fork if you wish. Usage instructions can be found at the demo page, and at the the GitHub repository.

A list of features:

Made for Twitter Bootstrap

Designed to be used with Bootstrap 3. If you don’t want to use bootstrap, just fork the repo and customize it to your needs!

Mobile first & PE

Built with mobile first and progressive enhancement in mind. Also built with love and with the help of a fair amount of coffee.

Graceful JS fallback

In browsers without JavaScript, the tables will still be scrollable. I.e. there’s still some responsiveness.

Easy to use

You only need to add one JS-file, one CSS-file and some minimal setup to make the tables responsive. Dependencies: jQuery and Twitter Bootstrap 3.

If you’re really in need of responsive tables, this could be another option for you, so it’s at least worth knowing about and checking out.