Flash TWRP .img File From Ubuntu Using Fastboot

twrp

I use TWRP (TeamWin Recovery Project) on my Nexus 4. Back in the day (read: 3 years ago) I used ClockworkMod Recovery, on my Moto Defy, but have since switched to TWRP. I believe there were some licensing issues that drove a lot of people away from CWM. In any case, you’ll want to install adb and fastboot before proceeding.

From an Ubuntu distribution (Xubuntu in my case):

After adb and fastboot have been installed, boot your Nexus 4 into fastboot mode. Just switch your Nexus 4 off, then turn it back on while holding the volume down button. Keep holding the down button until you see a menu (usually with an Android guy somewhere on the screen). Entering fastboot mode may be different for your device, check the TWRP site, they have instructions for a lot of different devices.

Now, make sure your PC sees your device in fastboot mode. In a terminal window, run fastboot devices. If nothing is printed to the terminal, something is wrong, you probably don’t have fastboot enabled. If you did see some output, you should be good to go.

Download the latest recovery .img file from the TWRP site. Current version as of this post is 2.7.0.0. To flash it using fastboot, do this in a terminal:

If everything goes well, you should see something similar to this:

sending ‘recovery’ (8130 KB)…
OKAY [ 0.510s]
writing ‘recovery’…
OKAY [ 0.476s]
finished. total time: 0.987s

If you see something other than OKAY messages, something is probably wrong, and I have no idea what. If you do see the OKAY messages, you can either reboot your phone to Android or go to recovery which will take you to TWRP. With TWRP you can make a nandroid backup, flash new roms, flash new gapps, and all kinds of other things.

Infographic: Global Cell Phone Statistics

The Infographic

The post title pretty much sums this one up. CouponAudit produced, with a little help from longren.org, an infographic showing Global Cell Phone Statistics. I’m not usually a fan of infographics but this one appealed to me due to it’s simplicity and the fact that I am pretty obsessed with smartphones, tablets, and other portable devices.

There’s not too many surprising things in it, but it’s interesting to note that older age groups (30+) have a higher percentage of e-readers compared with their younger (16 to 29) peers. I guess that makes sense, people like my mom and aunt are more likely to buy a Kindle or similar device than I am. I always go Android, unless I’m gifted an iOS device. Some e-readers just don’t have the flexibility that they should.

Somewhat surprisingly, only 25.6% of people in the 25 to 34 age group have smartphones. 25.6% is the highest percent from all the age groups, too. Every meatspace friend that I can think of owns a smartphone, so I’m not sure I totally agree with those numbers. Actually, there’s one friend who doesn’t own a smartphone, and he is probably the only IT Director in the country without a smartphone, but he refuses to get one. Most of my friends are in the 25 to 34 age range, with some quite older friends who even have smartphones. Perhaps it’s just due to the company I keep, who knows.

More interesting facts:

1. More than $150 billion was spent on mobile media globally in 2013.

2. The average american household spent, on average, $1,226 in 2013 for phone services. In 2007 it was $1,110 a year.

3. Samsung continues to be the most prolific manufacturers of smartphones and dumb phones.

4. 68% of smartphones run some version of Android, with 16.9% running Apple’s iOS.

5. Android recently hit 50 billion downloads on the Play Store.

6. The Apple AppStore hit 50 billion downloads 6 months earlier, but I think it had a considerable head-start with a well established app ecosystem from the git-go.

You can download the infographic right here. The link will open in a new tab. I’ve also included it after the break, if you’re reading from the frontpage, click the “Continue reading” link below to see the infographic embedded into this post. There’s also code you can copy to include the infographic on your website.

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Nexus 4 Mirror Is Closed

Nexus 4 Mirror

If you’re seeing this post, chances are good that you’re looking for the Nexus 4 mirror that used to be at nexus4.longren.org. After running nexus4.longren.org for a year or so, I’ve decided to close it down. The development around Nexus 4 software is starting to slow down now that the Nexus 5 is available. I’m still using my Nexus 4 but will likely be getting the Nexus 5 within a month or so. As such, I don’t have a great interest in custom Nexus 4 software, as I once did.

It doesn’t make much sense for me to commit so many resources to something I don’t really use any longer, so, a few weeks ago I posted an announcement on nexus4.longren.org noting that I’d be closing the site down on November 22nd, 2013. I didn’t close it down until late on the 22nd, and closed it down simply by using a 301 redirect via a .htaccess file.

Right after I closed it down, you probably started being redirected to 404′s at this site. This post is here to prevent that, as all traffic going to nexus4.longren.org will be redirected to this post to help inform everyone about why the site went away.

In all, about 120,000 downloads were made, but I didn’t start tracking that until about half-way through the life of the site. The gapps mirror from Michael Banks was by far the most popular. I almost renamed the site to “Banks Gapps Mirror” at one point.