How-To: Reset WordPress Database to Default Settings

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Easily Reset Your WordPress Database

WordPress Database Reset is a WordPress plugin I recently came across that will at some point prove very, very useful to me.

It’s not often that I need to reset a production WordPress database to it’s default settings, but this plugin will make the task a whole lot easier. Chris Berthe, the author, describes the plugin like this:

WordPress Database Reset is a secure and easy way to reinitialize your WordPress database back to its default settings without actually having to reinstall WordPress yourself.

I can see this being crazy useful for WordPress plugin and theme developers. We frequently need a fresh database to work with, so I’ll be adopting this plugin in my WordPress plugin and theme development workflow from here on.

WordPress Database Reset requires WordPress 3.0+ and can be installed just like any other WordPress plugin. It’s in the WordPress Plugin directory, and can also be found on GitHub.

If you’re a WordPress theme or plugin developer, you should definitely check it out.

Copy.com Referrals Give Crazy Amounts of Free Cloud Storage Space

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Lots of free cloud storage, 5GB for every referral :)

I use Copy a lot. I still maintain a Dropbox account for sharing files with friends who still use it, which is most of them honestly. But, I have such a crazy amount of free storage at Copy that I use it for absolutely everything.

All of my photos and video go there from my Nexus 4. On top of that, when my Nexus 4 gets full, I’ll just archive it to Copy, so I essentially have two of every photo and video in Copy. Dropbox holds just one copy of all videos and photos, I only have about 20GB of storage there, so that stuff eventually gets brought down to a local drive. Which I should probably just bring it local right off the bat and just skip Dropbox all together for that stuff. But I digress…

I’m currently using about 19GB out of 185GB available to me. It’s all due to this post I made back in August of 2013. It resulted in a bunch of referral signups, which gave me an additional 5GB each. I started out with 15GB of storage.

If you’re a blogger and want some decent amounts of free cloud storage, check out Copy. Drop your referral link in relevant posts and you’ll slowly start building up referrals and gaining additional storage.

Copy has clients for Android, iOS, Linux, Windows, MacOS, and probably others. Just visit their download page. I’ve been very impressed with Copy and have been using them for nearly a year. They’re run by Barracuda Networks.

I dig Copy’s Fair Storage concept, which they explain like this:

We believe in a simple concept of fairness. Everyone paying for the same data they are sharing doesn’t work for us. We think that’s like going to dinner together and everyone having to pay the entire bill. People sharing content should equally divide the amount of storage being used. With Copy, you can split the bill. So a 12 GB folder shared between 3 people only counts as 4 GB per person.

Unless I’m missing something, that sounds as lot better than what Dropbox does. With Dropbox, if someone shares a 4GB folder with me, that’s 4GB taken away from my available storage, plus the other persons. So both of us ending up getting the 4GB taken from our accounts. Fucked, but that’s a topic for another post.

I still think you should check out Copy. I seriously recommend it, and that’s after I’ve been using it constantly for nearly the last year. I’ve a couple minor gripes about the Linux client, but I can deal with them.

Affiliate links are rampant throughout this post. If you don’t want to help me out, here’s a non-affiliate link for Copy, and here’s a non-affiliate link for Dropbox. Pretty sure you get extra space if you sign up from an affiliate link though, so, your call. Here’s the affiliate Copy signup link and the affiliate Dropbox signup link. :)

Remove SSH Login Message After DigitalOcean WordPress One-Click Install

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After creating a new Droplet using the pre-built WordPress image provided by DigitalOcean, you’re presented with a very helpful message after logging in via SSH:

To finish installing WordPress, navigate to your droplet’s IP: http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Make sure to specify hostname from DO panel to your droplet before creating it (for example: ‘blog.mydomain.com’ or ‘myblog.com’)
This will create necessary Apache configs based on hostname and Apache will respond based on hostname.
Server will also respond to its IP address, so if you finish installation from http://IP then
you will need to change hostname from WordPress Settings later (from http://IP to http://hostname)

It’s a really helpful message, especially if you’re new to DigitalOcean and even more so if you’re new to hosting stuff on your own (ie: unmanaged hosting). However, the message isn’t really helpful after the first login, maybe two logins.

There’s a great article on how to get setup after using the One-Click WordPress install, but removing the message is never mentioned.

It’s just a message of the day, the configuration for which can be found in /etc/motd. Delete line 2, and you should be good to go.

HTML Boilerplate

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I’ve been using this for a boilerplate lately, it’s pretty nice, and not all that different from the piece of HTML I’ve had saved on Dropbox for the last 10 years.

It provides a bare, standards-compliant starting point for your websites, giving you just enough to get started, making it easy to add your own stuff in.

It’s available under the MIT license, which is GPL compatible, and can be downloaded from GitHub.

There are a few things you may want to customize before you start writing a bunch of content, though. This is taken straight from the README on GitHub. Take these points into consideration, especially page titles, css includes, and javascript includes.

  • Document’s language
  • Meta description
  • Title
  • Favicon file
  • CSS includes
  • Javascript includes

cdnjs Website Source Available on GitHub

cdnjs

The public facing website for cdnjs.com

cdnjs.com is a popular CDN hosting popular javascript libraries.

They recently released the source to their new website, making it available on a GitHub.com repository.

The new site is built with nodejs and CSS.

This repository is just for the cdnjs.com website, not for adding a library to cdnjs.com. Adding a library to cdnjs.com is still done via this GitHub repository.

I like cdnjs, I use it and jsDelivr a LOT.

There’s probably some interesting bits to be found in the cdnjs.com website, and you can have access to it all on GitHub now, instead of viewing the page source. :)

Update April 24, 2014: Thank you Thomas for pointing out the actual new website repository. Think the fact that the old, deprecated repository was trending on GitHub threw me off, lol.