Remove SSH Login Message After DigitalOcean WordPress One-Click Install

do

After creating a new Droplet using the pre-built WordPress image provided by DigitalOcean, you’re presented with a very helpful message after logging in via SSH:

To finish installing WordPress, navigate to your droplet’s IP: http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Make sure to specify hostname from DO panel to your droplet before creating it (for example: ‘blog.mydomain.com’ or ‘myblog.com’)
This will create necessary Apache configs based on hostname and Apache will respond based on hostname.
Server will also respond to its IP address, so if you finish installation from http://IP then
you will need to change hostname from WordPress Settings later (from http://IP to http://hostname)

It’s a really helpful message, especially if you’re new to DigitalOcean and even more so if you’re new to hosting stuff on your own (ie: unmanaged hosting). However, the message isn’t really helpful after the first login, maybe two logins.

There’s a great article on how to get setup after using the One-Click WordPress install, but removing the message is never mentioned.

It’s just a message of the day, the configuration for which can be found in /etc/motd. Delete line 2, and you should be good to go.

HTML Boilerplate

HTML5_Logo_512

I’ve been using this for a boilerplate lately, it’s pretty nice, and not all that different from the piece of HTML I’ve had saved on Dropbox for the last 10 years.

It provides a bare, standards-compliant starting point for your websites, giving you just enough to get started, making it easy to add your own stuff in.

It’s available under the MIT license, which is GPL compatible, and can be downloaded from GitHub.

There are a few things you may want to customize before you start writing a bunch of content, though. This is taken straight from the README on GitHub. Take these points into consideration, especially page titles, css includes, and javascript includes.

  • Document’s language
  • Meta description
  • Title
  • Favicon file
  • CSS includes
  • Javascript includes

cdnjs Website Source Available on GitHub

cdnjs

The public facing website for cdnjs.com

cdnjs.com is a popular CDN hosting popular javascript libraries.

They recently released the source to their new website, making it available on a GitHub.com repository.

The new site is built with nodejs and CSS.

This repository is just for the cdnjs.com website, not for adding a library to cdnjs.com. Adding a library to cdnjs.com is still done via this GitHub repository.

I like cdnjs, I use it and jsDelivr a LOT.

There’s probably some interesting bits to be found in the cdnjs.com website, and you can have access to it all on GitHub now, instead of viewing the page source. :)

Update April 24, 2014: Thank you Thomas for pointing out the actual new website repository. Think the fact that the old, deprecated repository was trending on GitHub threw me off, lol.

Version 0.0.3 of jQuery Sticky Alerts Plugin Now Available

newversion

I’ve released version 0.0.3 of my Sticky Alerts jQuery plugin. It’s available on GitHub and is now indexed at plugins.jquery.com.

I’ve added a feature to remember if the bar has been closed or not. This is done via cookies, and there’s an option to set. The option, cookieRememberDays, default to 2. If you want to disable it (ie: bar will appear every time the page is loaded no matter what), you need to set cookieRememberDays to a value of 0.

To keep the bar closed for 7 days, do something like this:

To keep it as-is, and make the bar open on every page load, do this:

Head on over to GitHub for a download link, or click here to download version 0.0.3 directly from the GitHub tag.

Hover.css and iHover: Pure CSS3 Hover Effects Collections

ihover

Hover all the things!

I’ve used Hover.css in previous projects and love it. As described by it’s author:

A collection of CSS3 powered hover effects to be applied to call to actions, buttons, logos, featured images and so on. Easily apply to your own elements, modify or just use for inspiration. Available in CSS and SASS.

I recently stumbled on iHover, which is very similar to Hover.css. The only major difference is their homepage demo’s. Hover.css uses text, iHover uses images in their demos.

Here’s how iHover is described on it’s website:

iHover is an impressive hover effects collection, powered by pure CSS3, no dependency, work well with Bootstrap 3!

Hover.css is quite a bit smaller than iHover is, but it’s not as feature packed. That’s the exact reason that I’ve used Hover.css in previous projects. It’s so small but gives so many neat hover effects.

iHover effects are mostly taken from codrops articles, and was inspired specifically by this article on codrops.

You can find a demo of iHover here and a demo of Hover.css here.

Both iHover and Hover.css are on GitHub. iHover can be found on GitHub here, while Hover.css can be found on GitHub here.

What do you think? Would you ever use one of these? Have you used either, or something similar?